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Free at last: Bulldozer leaves Valhalla Resort after 43 years

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The Army Surplus bulldozer that was buried for 43 years was towed from Valhalla Resort last Thursday. The bulldozer is now at the Perham Pioneer Village. (Carter Jones/ FOCUS) 2 / 6
The Minnesota National Guard initially agreed to unearth the bulldozer until this cartoon was published in the Detroit Lakes Tribune. 3 / 6
A crane from Jim's Towing in Fargo lowers the Army surplus bulldozer onto a flatbed trailer. The bulldozer is now at the Perham Pioneer Village. (Carter Jones/ FOCUS) 4 / 6
A crane from Jim's Towing in Fargo prepares to hoist the Army surplus bulldozer onto a flatbed trailer. The bulldozer is now at the Perham Pioneer Village. (Carter Jones/ FOCUS) 5 / 6
The Army Surplus bulldozer that was buried for 43 years was towed from Valhalla Resort last Thursday. The bulldozer is now at the Perham Pioneer Village. (Carter Jones/ FOCUS) 6 / 6

The army surplus bulldozer that was resurrected in March after being buried for 43 years is now at the Perham Pioneer Village.

Last Thursday, a truck from Jim's Towing in Fargo towed the 56,000 pound bulldozer from its home at Valhalla Resort north of Perham.

Jeff Jahnke, who helped find the bulldozer with a group of friends, said the machine will be cleaned thoroughly and power washed before the engine is restored to working order.

The bulldozer was being used to make a snowmobile trail in December 1975, before it sank in a swamp. Jim's Towing used three trucks with a combined 400,000 pounds of force to unearth the bulldozer in March.

Senator Hubert H. Humprhey was enlisted to call in the Minnesota National Guard to remove the bulldozer as part of a training exercise. However, the military called off the exercise after being offended by an editorial cartoon that was published in the Detroit Lakes Tribune.

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