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Phelps Mill plans for improvements thanks to grant

The Greater Minnesota Regional Parks and Trails Commission recently completed its application review process and chose Phelps Mill County Park and 13 other parks and trails around the state for $11.4 million in funding for fiscal year 2024.

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Phelps Mill
Contributed / Shannon Terry
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OTTER TAIL COUNTY — People who enjoy the historic Phelps Mill Park area will soon have their experiences enhanced, once recommendations are approved to fund $366,000 of improvements at the county park, Otter Tail County reported.

The Greater Minnesota Regional Parks and Trails Commission recently completed its application review process and chose Phelps Mill County Park and 13 other parks and trails around the state for $11.4 million in funding for fiscal year 2024. The GMRPTC will now recommend that the Minnesota Legislature approve funding through the Parks and Trails Legacy Fund, one of four funds created by the 2008 Minnesota Clean Water, Land and Legacy Amendment. The Legislature has annually approved GMRPTC recommendations since Legacy Funds are already dedicated and may only be spent to support parks and trails of regional or statewide significance.

“We are excited to have been selected for this grant from the Greater Minnesota Regional Parks and Trails Commission, which will allow us to make enhancements to the popular park,” said Otter Tail County Parks and Trails Director Kevin Fellbaum. “Area residents and visitors already enjoy the history and beauty of Phelps Mill, and this needed funding will make their visits better than ever.”

For more information about the park and trail system in Otter Tail County, go to ottertailcountymn.us/parks-and-trails. The Phelps Mill historic mill building ribbon-cutting ceremony will occur this summer.

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