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Minnesota state veterinarian leaving for post in South Dakota

Dr. Beth Thompson, who also is Minnesota's Board of Animal Health executive director, announced she is resigning from her position effective May 8, according to Tuesday, April 12, news release.

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ST. PAUL — The Minnesota state veterinarian is resigning to take the same post in her home state of South Dakota.

Dr. Beth Thompson, who also is Minnesota's Board of Animal Health executive director, announced she is resigning from her position effective May 8, according to a Tuesday, April 12, news release.

Assistant director Dr. Linda Glaser will serve as interim Minnesota state veterinarian beginning May 9, according to the release.

“When the state veterinarian position opened up in my home state earlier this year, I decided to apply and see where things went,” Thompson said. “I was offered the position earlier this month and accepted this opportunity to be closer to family and friends. Although I’m departing amidst the HPAI outbreak, our response is strong, and I leave this agency in very capable hands.”

Thompson notified the Board of Animal Health members Tuesday, April 12, during the board's quarterly meeting, according to the release.

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The board will announce an application period for the position in the coming weeks.

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