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West Central Initiative seeks input for regional climate action plan

The second phase of the project will incorporate the public's feedback from phase one and include additional strategies and goals.

A brief history on climate change (without the politics)
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FERGUS FALLS, Minn. — The first phase of a climate action plan for west-central Minnesota is set to begin in early June.

The West Central Initiative and paleBLUEdot LLC are working together to discover the most "important climate-related issues in our region," said Mark Kaelke, assistant community planner for the West Central Initiative, in a press release.

"Circulating the survey to receive as many responses as possible is a critical first step in creating an effective plan," Kaelke said.

In addition to gathering information, paleBLUEdot will compile area-specific data on energy use and emissions, infrastructure, natural resources, transportation and potential renewable energy sources.

The second phase of the project will incorporate the public's feedback from phase one and include additional strategies and goals. The study, which can be found at palebluedot.llc/wci-climate-action-survey, is set for completion in the spring of 2023.

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West Central Initiative is philanthropic economic development organization serving in nine west-central Minnesota counties.

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