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Perham school receives grant

The Minnesota Agricultural Education Leadership Council (MAELC) awarded a $10,000 grant to the Perham High School Agricultural Education Department.

The Minnesota Agricultural Education Leadership Council (MAELC) awarded a $10,000 grant to the Perham High School Agricultural Education Department.

This grant will be used to construct a hydroponic and research greenhouse for students. The Perham school system has a strong agricultural education program that is led by teacher, Carl Aakre.

MAELC grants range in scale from funding College in the School curriculum in local high school agricultural education programs to helping fund a topography mapping project in northwestern Minnesota. A total of 22 grants are being awarded to schools and organizations around Minnesota. Since its creation in 1997, MAELC has provided over $1.2 million in competitive grants, scholarships, sponsored projects and awards.

Three types of grant applications were funded. Innovation grants are open to any school or organization whose program focuses on educating youth and the public about agriculture in an innovative way. Priority Issues Grants are targeted specifically towards high school agricultural education programs. Quality Program Grants align with the MAELC strategic plan of recruitment, retention, and transition of agricultural education students and teachers.

Established in 1997 by the Minnesota Legislature, MAELC is comprised of sixteen educators, legislators, government officials, and agribusiness and community organization representatives. The Council represents all of the major institutions and groups in Minnesota with an interest in agricultural education and serves as a focal point for initiatives to improve agricultural education in the state.

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