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Sender of threatening letter to Fergus Falls courthouse in custody

Fergus Falls Chief of Public Safety Kile Bergren confirmed Friday morning that no hazardous material was found inside an envelope mailed to the federal courthouse in Fergus Falls Dec. 27. Bergren, who was contacted by the United States Marshal Se...

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R.C. Drews | Daily journal Return to sender: Law enforcement evacuates the Federal Courthouse in Fergus Falls after a threatening letter arrived Dec. 27, 2018

Fergus Falls Chief of Public Safety Kile Bergren confirmed Friday morning that no hazardous material was found inside an envelope mailed to the federal courthouse in Fergus Falls Dec. 27. Bergren, who was contacted by the United States Marshal Service about the receipt of a letter that was "threatening in nature" on the morning of Dec. 27, blocked approaches to the building on South Mill Street before entering to check the threat along with Fergus Falls Fire Chief Ryan Muchow. Wearing protective clothing and air tanks, the two men evacuated two people from the building and checked the envelope in which the letter arrived. They did not find any hazardous material inside the envelope but the courthouse was closed for an investigation by federal authorities and did not reopen until Jan. 2. Bergren said the envelope and letter were later tested by the Minnesota Department of Health which confirmed the absence, not only of anthrax but of any harmful material.

Bergren also said federal authorities know the individual who sent the letter. He has been in the custody of the state of Texas at one of their prison facilities for "quite some time," according to Bergren. Bergren did not speculate on why the letter was sent to the Fergus Falls courthouse

Related Topics: POLICE
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