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Set your clocks back an hour on Sunday

Do you think you'll get an extra hour of sleep when Daylight Saving goes off this weekend? Think again. Studies show most people stay up that extra hour, and actually get an hour less sleep. At 2 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 1, time "falls back" until next ...

Do you think you’ll get an extra hour of sleep when Daylight Saving goes off this weekend?

Think again. Studies show most people stay up that extra hour, and actually get an hour less sleep.

At 2 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 1, time “falls back” until next March, when it will “spring forward.” In the United States, this ritual became official as a way to save energy during World War I. However, it is unlikely in today’s electronic world that any energy is saved.

Most smartphones, tablets, computers and other electronic devices will switch the time automatically. But the stove, microwave, radios, alarm clocks and traditional watches, all need to be set manually – which can be an exercise in frustration for some with OCD tendencies. Setting all these clocks, which might be in different rooms, to turn at the exact same moment is difficult, if not impossible.

So why observe Daylight Saving?

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Several states and U.S. territories don’t, including Arizona, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Gaum and the Northern Mariana Islands. And Utah has considered succeeding from the practice of turning clocks ahead or behind.

While vacationers to our land of many lakes may appreciate the practice, which allows extra daylight time the summer, arguably the best time of the year in these parts, farmers, especially those who work dairy cows, may resort to transitioning milking time to accommodate the milking cycle. Others change their own times of operation to keep the cows milking cycle on track, according to extension expert guy or farmer.

“In days past, the hour time difference did make a difference for cows” according to Doug Holen, an extension educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service. “The consistency pattern is important for maximum production. (The time change) was also a safety factor for farmers bringing their cows into the barn while it was dark outside. And some farmers simply adjust their own schedule.”

For farmers whose cows self-milk, Holen said, the time change just isn’t a problem and many other farmers have a system to adjust to the time change, so these days the hour time difference doesn’t have the same impact it once did.

So perhaps the biggest annoyance for people living in these modern times is just aligning all the clocks that aren’t on their smartphone or tablet. At any rate, remember to fall back on Sunday or you may be late for church. 

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