ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

She was "gentle and kind" - Listen to episode 3 of "A Better Search for Barbara Cotton"

A Better Search for Barbara Cotton is an investigative podcast series about one of North Dakota's longest running cold cases, the disappearance of 15-year-old Barbara Cotton of Williston, N.D.

missing-barbara-cotton-recreation-park-williston-dakota-spotlight-podcast.jpg
Barbara would possibly have passed through Recreation Park and then continued along 5th Street West on her way home.

In Episode 3, we take a closer look at the initial police investigation. We also ask the question: Might Barbara's kindness and big heart have led to her demise?

Listen to Episode 3

Listen to Previous Episodes:

barbara-cotton-plainsman-williston-missing-dakota-spotlight.jpg
Barbara Cotton was reportedly last seen walking from the area of the Plainsman building towards Recreation Park.

ADVERTISEMENT

The podcast will be released over five days starting March 1, 2021. Listen here or anywhere podcasts are found ( Spotify , Apple , Google Podcasts , Stitcher etc.)

RELATED:

Information about Missing Kids
True Crime podcasts BY JAMES WOLNER

RELATED Podcast homepage | Newsletter | Season 3 videos | Season 2: 1976 Zick murders | jwolner@forumcomm.com

James Wolner is a Digital Content Producer at Forum Communications Company, Fargo North Dakota and the creator, producer and host of Dakota Spotlight, a true crime podcast. He has lived the Upper Midwest since 2013 and studied photojournalism at California State University at Fresno. He is fluent in English and Swedish.
What To Read Next
Joseph Rolette is often recognized as the man who kept St. Paul from losing its status as the state capital in 1857, but his actions likely had little effect on the matter. He was memorable, though.
The Apostle Supper Club, atop the Radisson Hotel, is one of only about 15 revolving restaurants still operational and open to the public in the United States.
In the federal government's crackdown on sex trafficking in the '50s, law enforcement allied with trafficking victims, whose testimonies helped fuel the arrests of more than 100 in the Midwest.
Larry Race maintains his innocence even after being convicted in 1983 of his wife’s murder. He has since been released after serving his sentence.