ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Ask a Trooper: Take caution on flashing yellow turn arrow

Jesse-Grabow.jpg
Sgt. Jesse Grabow, Minnesota State Patrol

Question: When turning left on a blinking yellow light, should one pull into the intersection? It seems like a blinking yellow should let at least one car through, but often cars will wait behind the line, negating the ability to move traffic through the intersection.

Answer: If you are at a flashing yellow light and are preparing to turn left, enter the intersection with caution. Drivers are allowed to turn left after yielding to all oncoming traffic and to any pedestrians in the crosswalk. Oncoming traffic has a green light. Drivers must wait for a safe gap in oncoming traffic before turning.

If a vehicle ahead of you is signaling for a left turn, slow down and prepare to stop.

If you are behind a vehicle making a left turn, do not enter the intersection in case the traffic light turns red as you might not be able to clear the intersection. This type of maneuver is against the law per Minnesota statute 169.15 IMPEDING TRAFFIC; INTERSECTION GRIDLOCK.

The intersection gridlock law applies specifically to entering an intersection (at a traffic control light) that you can’t cross because traffic is backed up through the intersection due to another red light, train, etc. Entering the intersection in this case is against the law. It happens in many cities and creates a lot of problems with the flow-of-traffic when one direction of traffic cannot continue on a green light because vehicles on the cross road are stopped and blocking the other lanes of traffic.

What To Read Next
"Life is short, ends in a moment, and we don’t think much about it some days. ... It’s a scenic highway, and we should keep it that way, go a bit slower, and enjoy life."
Leadership takes honest reflection and thinking about the needs of others, Jenny Schlecht writes. With that in mind, do we have the right leaders to get a new farm bill passed by Sept. 30?
"Church worship now competes with everything from professional sports to kids activities to household chores. ... we can either have a frank conversation about what church can be, or we can continue to watch the pews empty in cherished houses of worship across the country."
When Katie Pinke directed her daughter to a beef expert in preparation for her speech meet, it made her think about the need for trusted ag sources of information.