ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Letter: The rules of life are very simple

She never understood that many countries with robust capitalism, like Norway or Sweden, also have Medicare for all, subsidized childcare, sturdy maternal and paternal leave, and subsidized post-secondary education that doesn’t require students to go into debt to earn a degree or learn a trade.

Letter to the Editor web graphic dlpf.png
(File Image)
We are part of The Trust Project.

The following is a letter to the editor submitted by a reader. It does not necessarily reflect the views of this newspaper. To submit a letter, email nbowe@dlnewspapers.com. 

Too many Americans, especially laissez-faire Republicans but also neoliberal Democrats, are devoted to the selfish, authoritarian philosophy of Ayn Rand, a woman whose tragic early life experiences turned her into a woman so narcissistic and self-serving that she recommended we let others die on the streets if they don’t have enough. That way, she said, we can have more than we need.

She never understood that many countries with robust capitalism, like Norway or Sweden, also have Medicare for all, subsidized childcare, sturdy maternal and paternal leave, and subsidized post-secondary education that doesn’t require students to go into debt to earn a degree or learn a trade.

What matters in life is having enough, not too much. What matters is community, which translates into English as cooperation. Some Americans I’ve met lately act as if the word comes from across the sea. It doesn’t. The laws that are best are the ones that do the greatest good for the largest number of people.

Ayn Rand cult members claim to value freedom and individualism but, at one extreme, want to take away Social Security and Medicare, two programs that increase freedom and protect individuals. They also want to restrict a woman's right to choose how to live their own lives.

ADVERTISEMENT

Some of us, despite inflation, have been lucky. We have enough. We take one day at a time, live each moment to the full, and give back as warranted by our means. We’re civil even to those who curse us. We do our best to practice the Golden Rule — do to others as you want done to yourself — and the Serenity Prayer: Give me courage to change things I can, serenity to accept things I can’t, and the wisdom to tell the difference.

None of us need more. We only need enough. Life is a series of adventures and misadventures. There’s great beauty around us. The earth zips around the sun at 67,000 mph. If you stand still, you can feel it move under your feet. It’s fragile. All of us are stuck on it together.

The rules, therefore, are very simple:

  1. Give sustenance and compassion to everybody you meet.
  2. Regulate guns, not women.
  3. Work for a society where medical care is available without regard for financial or employment status.
  4. Vote for candidates who honor everybody, not just members of their own tribe. The Constitution and its amendments guarantee the vote to every citizen. Honor that right. Make voting easy for all. And honor the results.
  5. Love your neighbor. Love isn’t all you need, but it’s a place to start and a place to stop.

Perhaps JFK, in his famous “Peace Speech” at American University in 1963, the year he was assassinated by a man with a murderous weapon, put it best: “For, in the final analysis, our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet. We all breathe the same air. We all cherish our children’s future. And we are all mortal.”

Related Topics: COMMENTARY
What to read next
Thank you for placing a marker at St. Stan’s honoring Michael Murphy and all veterans lying nearby in unmarked graves.
“We have critical systems,” said Chief Deputy Shane Richard. “When we have a failure, we need someone with the knowledge of our systems here, someone who can basically spring into action and fix the issues.”
Miss Perham is crowned, Turtle Fest is a hit, and other top headlines from Perham's past.
Perham racer thankful for local support