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ABORTION

Executive order also aims to protect North Dakotans and other out of state residents who seek abortion in Minnesota
"After we shed a few communal tears, we wiped them and we took a deep breath, and we got to work,” a women's health clinic employee told a crowd of hundreds who gathered outside the federal courthouse in downtown Minneapolis Friday evening. “Because we have to give the same care to the patients we saw yesterday and to the patients we saw today because we still need abortion care.”
Minnesota could become an island for abortion access in the Midwest in the wake of Supreme Court decision on abortion.
The court, in a 6-3 ruling powered by its conservative majority, upheld a Republican-backed Mississippi law that bans abortion after 15 weeks.

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Amid wide national variability, abortion rates have remained relatively stable in Minnesota and North Dakota since 2017, while falling sharply in South Dakota. Abortion travel is likely behind the variations.
The speculation began last month, after a leaked draft of a U.S. Supreme Court opinion suggested the court is poised to overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that guaranteed the right to an abortion nationwide. Indigenous abortion rights advocates say the questions have mostly come from non-Native people: “All of a sudden, this issue that’s going to impact white women too — or impact white women more broadly — now we’re being seen as the potential savior."
“No one who travels from another state to seek an abortion that’s legal in Minnesota is going to be prosecuted,” the attorney general said. “I will oppose extradition requests from other states for people who’ve engaged in legal conduct in Minnesota.”
The nine justices are weighing whether to revive Mississippi's ban on abortion starting at 15 weeks of pregnancy, a law blocked by lower courts as clearly in violation of the Roe v. Wade precedent.
The scene at the court has become more tense following protests and threats against some justices prompted by the May leak of a draft opinion indicating they are set to overturn the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling.
Rape and incest exceptions have been an accepted part of most abortion bans since the early 1990s, but that was not always the case. For a dozen years, they were not part of the so-called Hyde Amendment, the provision inserted in annual federal spending bills that bars the use of almost all federal funds for abortion.

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Experts say obstetrics and gynecology training programs in so-called "abortion refugee" states such as Minnesota will be needed to serve an increase of out-of-state physicians seeking training in abortion care as part of an accredited program. Mayo and UMN offer the only such residencies in Minnesota.
It's a potential bright spot for Democrats heading into the Nov. 8 midterm elections, when Republicans are broadly favored to win a majority of at least one chamber in Congress.
The abortion bans that would go into effect would prosecute providers, such as doctors, or pharmacists who provide abortion-inducing pills.

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