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GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

The Minnesota legislative session fizzled to a close on Monday with many top issues left unresolved.
Mental health advocates and public safety officials said the funding could help those in crisis and close gaps for those deemed incompetent to stand trial.
The call for an investigation comes after reports that Sen. Omar Fateh carried legislation for a group that endorsed him and a campaign volunteer was convicted in federal court.
Roughly 667,000 Minnesotans could receive the checks if they apply. And the state expected to start sending them out beginning in September.

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Here's a look at what happened in the final weekend of the legislative session and what could happen next.
The GOP candidates addressed hundreds gathered Monday on the Capitol steps after Scott Jensen and several others officially registered with the scretary of state to run in 2022. Jensen, a former state senator and Chaska family-practice physician skeptical of COVID-19 vaccines and restrictions, started campaigning for governor in 2021.
Bills in the Senate and House would have allowed the state’s tribal casinos to run in-person and mobile sports betting for people 21 and older in Minnesota. But a disagreement over whether to allow two Twin Cities-area horse racing tracks to also host betting ultimately derailed the push.
The governor said he would meet with legislative leaders on Monday morning in hopes of reaching deals that could get approved in a special session.
The current framework for the bonding proposal would put $1 billion toward state agency projects with an emphasis on preserving existing assets. Local projects would get $400 million. But with just hours before a deadline to pass any bills, no proposal had fully materialized.
The proposal would let the state's biggest breweries sell growlers from their taprooms and allow smaller breweries to sell four and six-packs of beer.

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Lawmakers had just hours left to finish $8 billion in spending and tax plans before a midnight deadline and several large bills had not yet been wrapped up.
In addition to spending, the higher education bill also includes a provision that would require all higher education institutions to include an affirmative consent standard as part of their sexual conduct policies.
Ellison received resounding support for his work over the last four years.

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