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VAULT - HISTORICAL

Joseph Rolette is often recognized as the man who kept St. Paul from losing its status as the state capital in 1857, but his actions likely had little effect on the matter. He was memorable, though.
In the federal government's crackdown on sex trafficking in the '50s, law enforcement allied with trafficking victims, whose testimonies helped fuel the arrests of more than 100 in the Midwest.
Officials called it 'the most baffling and mysterious fire cases' in the state's history. Who or what was responsible?
It's now a ghost town, yet in its heyday, everyone might have known your name in Craigville, Minnesota. But their saloons were also reportedly some of the rowdiest and most unruly in the state.

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Where did Al Capone and other mobsters hunker down in in the Upper Midwest? Who was 'Creepy' Karpis? What happened in the Bohn kidnapping? All these stories and more in Best of The Vault 2022.
The legacy left from that fateful day lives on. Columnist Steve Lange tells the story.
Linda Hazzard saw the wealthy Williamson sisters as the perfect victims for her dangerous fasting 'cure.' But when one died and the other dropped to 50 pounds, authorities started paying attention.
It was an almost impenetrable copper box inside a cornerstone of Trinity Lutheran Church. Members learned it was a time capsule with surprises from the past, but what did the past want to share?
Some of Linda Burfield Hazzard's patients described her as a gifted and intelligent healer who helped them overcome all sorts of maladies. Others considered her a serial killer.
Since its construction in 1885 by Civil War veterans, the Grand Army of the Republic Hall in Litchfield (the first built in Minnesota), remains a perfectly preserved piece of history, the same as it was when being used by veterans who built it as a place to gather, connect and socialize.

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Eighteen miles northwest of Bemidji, in the backwoods of Buzzle Township, is Pinewood — once an operative logging camp filled with lumberjacks and early settlers. Throughout its history, this once lively community has become a place of unsolved mysteries, two bank robberies, a bizarre train derailment and multiple wildfires.
In the 1920s, Engolf Snortland started running with a bad crowd, later kidnapped the wrong man, and went to prison. He moved home to North Dakota for a fresh start, only to be shot dead. In the years to come, the fallout from his unusual case would reach the state Supreme Court and inspire groundbreaking legislation in North Dakota.
The only known flyer from the doomed show in Minnesota became the most expensive concert poster sold at auction. Buddy Holly and several other musicians died on their way to the show in 1959.

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